Celebrate Beverly Cleary

 
       

 

Many of my books have Kindle versions, and some are Kindle-only. Read Kindle ebooks on any tablet, computer, or smartphone with the official free app!

kindle app

 

 

Hosted By Web Hosting by BizLand

Instagram

 

 

 

 

 

Beverly Cleary's Books

Click any cover image or title to jump to Amazon.com.

 
 

 

The Henry Huggins Books

Henry HugginsHenry Huggins, 1950. Just as Henry Huggins is complaining that nothing exciting ever happens, a friendly dog sits down beside him and looks pleadingly at his ice-cream cone. From that moment on, the two are inseparable. But when Ribsy's original owner appears, trying to reclaim his dog, Henry's faced with the possibility of losing his new best friend.
 
 
Henry and BeezusHenry and Beezus, 1952. Henry's attempts at raising money for his bike fund keep falling flat. Selling bubble gum on the playground gets him in trouble with his teacher, and then Ribsy's nose for mischief almost ruins Henry's paper route. Even pesky little Ramona Quimby manages to get in the way of Henry's chance at a bike. But no matter what, Henry can always count on reliable Beezus to stick by his side.
 
 
Henry and RibsyHenry and Ribsy, 1954. From the first moment Henry found Ribsy, the curious mutt was poking his nose into things he shouldn't be. Whether terrorizing the garbage man, chasing cats, or gobbling Ramona Quimby's ice-cream cone, Henry's four-legged pal has walked himself into one problem too many. So when Henry asks his dad if he can go along on the big fishing trip, Mr. Huggins agrees, but on one condition: Ribsy must stay out of mischief for two whole months. Henry is confident in his loyal dog . . . until Ribsy goes overboard with his appetite for chaos!
 
 
Henry and the Paper RouteHenry and the Paper Route, 1957. All the older kids work their own paper route, but because Henry is not eleven yet, Mr. Capper won't let him. Desperate to change his mind, Henry tries everything he can think of to show he's mature and responsible enough for the job. From offering free kittens to new subscribers, to hauling hundreds of pounds of old newspapers for his school's paper drive, there's nothing Henry won't try. But it might just be the irrepressible Ramona Quimby who shows Mr. Capper just how capable Henry is.
 
 
Henry and the ClubhouseHenry and the Clubhouse, 1962. Henry and his friends are building a no-girls-allowed clubhouse. With a private space of their own away from everyone else—and even a top secret entry password—they're all thrilled with their boy fort. But Henry's about to find out that nothing—not even a sign—will keep gutsy Ramona out of their clubhouse . . . and her retaliation may just ruin Henry's newspaper career.
 
 
RibsyRibsy, 1964. Good ol' Ribsy's ever-curious mind has always gotten him into scrapes, but this time he may have gone too far. After a comical turn of events, Ribsy finds himself in the wrong station wagon with the wrong children. Ribsy will do anything to find Henry, but there's plenty of excitement to be had along the way—and scoring a touchdown for a local high school team is only part of the fun!
 
 

Socks

 
 
SocksSocks, 1973. Socks is one very happy cat. He lives the good life with his nice young owners, Mr. and Mrs. Bricker. They play with him when-ever he wants, feed him special treats, and always pet and scratch him when he curls up in their warm laps.Then a new baby arrives. Suddenly little Charles William is the one get-ting all the love and attention. Socks feels completely left out. To show how he feels about the new addition to the Bricker family, Socks starts getting into all sorts of trouble—with tomcats, phantom dogs, even Nana's best wig. It's not until Socks rescues Charles William from big, big trouble that Socks realizes just how much the Brickers truly want to keep him in the family.
 
 

The Ralph S. Mouse Books

 
 
Mouse and the MotorcycleThe Mouse and the Motorcycle, 1965. When the ever-curious Ralph spots Keith's red toy motorcycle, he vows to ride it. So when Keith leaves the bike unattended in his room one day, Ralph makes his move. But with all this freedom (and speed!) come a lot of obstacles. Whether dodging a rowdy terrier or keeping his nosy cousins away from his new wheels, Ralph has a lot going on! And with a pal like Keith always looking out for him, there's nothing this little mouse can't handle.
 
 
Runaway RalphRunaway Ralph, 1970. With a motorcycle to rev and the open road to see, Ralph S. Mouse is itching to run away from his overprotective family. But once he escapes to a summer campground nearby, the horrors of the wild make him doubt his plan. Angry cats, scary watchdogs, and grouchy gophers are only the half of it! But then he befriends Garf, a sad and friendless boy at the camp. Though he wants desperately to be back home with his relatives, Ralph realizes that he may need to help Garf before he can help himself.
 
 
Ralph S. MouseRalph S. Mouse, 1982. With his rowdy cousins constantly wearing out his motorcycle and the Mountain View Inn manager threatening to take care of the mouse infestation once and for all, Ralph decides it's time to get away for a while. He convinces his human friend Ryan to take him along to school, where Ralph instantly becomes the center of attention. But when Ryan's class decides to see how smart Ralph is by making him run a maze, the usually confident mouse starts to fret. What if he's not as clever as he thought?
 
 

Ellen Tebbits and Otis Spofford

 
 
Ellen TebbitsEllen Tebbits, 1951. Ellen was eight years old and wore bands on her teeth. Her best friend had just moved away and she missed her. Still, as she walked to the Spofford School of the Dance one Saturday, she was almost glad she had no best friend. Best friends do not have secrets from each other, and Ellen had a secret she did not want to share with anyone. But by the time the dancing lesson was over (surely the most devastating dancing lesson on record), Ellen had found a best friend and shared her secret. The best friend was Austine, and the secret was that Ellen was wearing woolen underwear. So was Austine!
 
 

Otis SpoffordOtis Spofford, 1953.There was nothing Otis Spofford liked better than stirring up a little excitement, particularly at school. A less resourceful teacher than Mrs. Gitler would have found him pretty hard to take. But even Mrs. Gitler did not entirely relish the bullfight at the fiesta arranged for the P.T.A. meeting. Otis was disappointed at not being the toreador, but as the front half of the bull he managed to steal the whole show, to the annoyance of his classmates and his teacher. It was then that Mrs. Gitler suggested that Otis might someday get his comeuppance.

Of all Otis's acquaintances, the neat and well-behaved Ellen Tebbits was the one he most enjoyed teasing. Strangely enough, it was Ellen who at last brought about his comeuppance. But before that happens, his losing spitball battle with Mrs. Gitler, his surprising affection for the experimental baby rat, and his insect collecting on behalf of the football hero provide a feast of fun for any child or grownup.

 
 

Emily Bartlett

 
 
Emily's Runaway ImaginationEmily's Runaway Imagination, 1961. Spunky Emily Bartlett lives in an old farmhouse in Pitchfork, Oregon'at a time when automobiles are brand-new inventions and libraries are a luxury few small towns can afford. Her runaway imagination leads her to bleach a horse, hold a very scary sleepover, and feed the hogs an unusual treat. But can she use her lively mind to help bring a library to Pitchfork?
 
 

Dear Mr. Henshaw

 
 
Dear Mr. HenshawDear Mr. Henshaw, 1983. Beverly Cleary's Newbery Medal-winning book explores the thoughts and emotions of a sixth-grade boy, Leigh Botts, in letter form as he writes to his favorite author, Boyd Henshaw. After his parents separate, Leigh Botts moves to a new town with his mother. Struggling to make friends and deal with his anger toward his absent father, Leigh loses himself in a class assignment in which he must write to his favorite author. When Mr. Henshaw responds, the two form an unexpected friendship that will change Leigh's life forever.
 
 

The Ramona Quimby Books

 
 
Beezus and Ramona, 1955. Having a little sister like four-year-old Ramona isn't always easy for Beezus Quimby. With a wild imagination, disregard for order, and an appetite for chaos, Ramona makes it hard for Beezus to be the responsible older sister she knows she ought to be . . . especially when Ramona threatens to ruin Beezus's birthday party.
 
 
Ramona the PestRamona the Pest, 1968. Ramona Quimby is excited to start kindergarten. No longer does she have to watch her older sister, Beezus, ride the bus to school with all the big kids. She's finally old enough to do it too! Then she gets into trouble for pulling her classmate's boingy curls during recess. Even worse, her crush rejects her in front of everyone. Beezus says Ramona needs to quit being a pest, but how can she stop if she never was trying to be one in the first place?
 
 
Ramona the BraveRamona the Brave, 1975. For a girl as enthusiastic about life as Ramona, starting the first grade should be easy! But with a teacher who doesn't understand her, a tattletale classmate, and a scary dog who follows her on the walk home from school, Ramona has a hard time acting like the big girl everyone expects her to be. But when she shows up to school with a missing shoe, Ramona gets a fresh grip on her courage in order to make it through a mortifying situation.
 
 
Ramona and Her FatherRamona and Her Father, 1977. Seven-year-old Ramona Quimby's world is turned upside-down when her father unexpectedly loses his job. Things grow tense in the Quimby house, but Ramona resolves to help in any way she can—even downsizing her Christmas list. But with bills piling up and her parents constantly stressed, Ramona wonders if life will ever go back to normal.
 
 
Ramona and Her MotherRamona and Her Mother, 1979. Ramona Quimby is no longer seven, but not quite eight. She's "seven and a half right now," if you ask her! Not allowed to stay home alone, yet old enough to watch pesky Willa Jean, Ramona wonders when her mother will treat her like her older, more mature sister, Beezus. But with her parents' unsettling quarrels and some spelling trouble at school, Ramona wonders if growing up is all it's cracked up to be. No matter what, she'll always be her mother's little girl . . . right? 
 
 
Ramona, Age 8Ramona Quimby, Age 8, 1981. Ramona likes that she’s old enough to be counted on, but must everything depend on her? Mrs. Quimby has gone back to work so that Mr. Quimby can return to school, and Ramona is expected to be good for Mrs. Kemp while her parents are away, to be brave enough to ride the school bus by herself, and to put up with being teased by Danny the Yard Ape. In Ramona’s world, being eight isn’t easy, but it’s never dull! 
 
 
Ramona ForeverRamona Forever, 1984. Life can move pretty fast—especially when you're in the third grade, your teenage sister's moods drive you crazy, and your mom has a suspicious secret she just won't share. Plus, Mr. Quimby's new job offer could have the entire family relocating. It's a lot to handle for Ramona. But whatever trial comes her way, Ramona can count on one thing for sure—she'll always be Ramona . . . forever!
 
 
Ramona's WorldRamona's World, 1999. Ramona Quimby can't wait to start fourth grade. With a new baby sister to brag about, new calluses to show off, and a new best friend to get to know, everything's going to be great! Or is it? When Ramona's spelling is atrocious, her teacher, Mrs. Meacham, is firm about her needing to improve. Then a scary incident at a friend's house leaves Ramona feeling at fault. Who knew growing up could be filled with such complicated situations?
 
       
       
       
Copyright © 2006-2016 J. E. Bright. All rights reserved.